Twin Peaks Explained
Are there any facts or theories about Annie's troubled past?

None that I know of other than her suicide attempt after a bad relationship, sorry!

I've heard a lot about the Deleted scenes for FWWM, who's seen them if they've never been on the releases? Also, Does Chris Isaac disappear to the BL? And if so, how? haha sorry for the bombardment
Anonymous

David Lynch, Robert Engels, Mark Frost and probably a whole load of other people. Over the years, some of the scenes were mentioned in interviews and there’s a lot of scenes in the script that aren’t featured in the film—although some weren’t shot, such as Benjamin Horne’s scenes. Mark Frost mentioned that if, and when, The Definitive Gold Box gets released on Blu-Ray, the deleted scenes will be included. There were a lot of legal problems with MK2, the production company who owns the footage.

And yes, it’s strongy implied that Chester Desmond, Chris Isaak’s character, disappears to the Black Lodge. When he disappears, he hears The Man From Another Place (MIKE)’s “Indian whooping sound” through the electricity lines. He then goes to a trailer—which, it’s interesting to note is called “The Arm”—and finds the Owl Ring underneath. Once he takes the ring, he disappears and considering the ring is connected to the Black Lodge, that’s the most logical place he could have wound up. It’s also worth noting “Let’s Rock” is written on his car after his disappearance.

There are several correlations between Twin Peaks and William S. Burrough’s novel Cities of the Red Night, published in 1981.
Cities of the Red Night makes specific mentions of Black and White Lodges and features non-linear plotlines regarding space and time—a key feature of the lodges in Twin Peaks. One of the novel’s protagonists, a detective named Clem Snide, is searching for a missing boy and uses the ancient Chinese text, the I Ching, to aid in his investigation. Likewise, Dale Cooper is investigating the death of Laura Palmer and uses ancient Tibetan methods to solve the murder.
Interestingly, it is rumoured David Lynch wanted Burroughs to play the role of Mayor Dwayne Milford in Twin Peaks, before the role went to John Boylan.

There are several correlations between Twin Peaks and William S. Burrough’s novel Cities of the Red Night, published in 1981.

Cities of the Red Night makes specific mentions of Black and White Lodges and features non-linear plotlines regarding space and time—a key feature of the lodges in Twin Peaks. One of the novel’s protagonists, a detective named Clem Snide, is searching for a missing boy and uses the ancient Chinese text, the I Ching, to aid in his investigation. Likewise, Dale Cooper is investigating the death of Laura Palmer and uses ancient Tibetan methods to solve the murder.

Interestingly, it is rumoured David Lynch wanted Burroughs to play the role of Mayor Dwayne Milford in Twin Peaks, before the role went to John Boylan.

Is there really really really really going to be a revival of twin peaks because I just heard about it and I'm frothing at the mouth quite literally

Aren’t we all?

Nothing official is confirmed. The rumours started after an anonymous post online claimed Lynch met with NBC executives to discuss bringing it back in 2014—“I’ll see you again in 25 years” ring some bells?—and Mark Frost took to Twitter but his tweet was rather vague. He didn’t actually deny it. And he hinted at a possible reunion two weeks ago in an interview too!

It’s all still a bit of a grey area. Until there’s news directly from NBC/Lynch, the rumours will run wild.

And just a quick note to apologise for the lack of posts recently! There’s a few lined up but in case you’re super curious about something our ask box is open.

What does the appearance of the angel in the red room at the end of FWWM mean?
Anonymous

Most people see it as a symbol that Laura is ascending/has ascended to The White Lodge—anyone have any other theories?

Who the hell is Diane?
Anonymous

Diane is Cooper’s—unseen—assistant at the FBI. There are theories that Diane is just a name for his tape recorder but she’s featured in a deleted scene from Fire Walk with Me.

In the hospital the food they serve seems poisioned, what does this mean? nobody eats it. is it just a random gross hospital-food ref, or has it something to do with the owls, bl, wl bob etc? what do u think
Anonymous

It was supposed to be a running gag throughout season 2 but was scrapped after a while. That’s all.

Interestingly though, when Donna first visits Mrs. Tremond/Chalfont—a Black Lodge spirit—she says “they used to bring me hospital food”, which means it could have meant to be some Black Lodge connection.

So I just got done watching FFWM and I'm a little confused on what happened in the scene with David Bowie. Can you explain?

I’ll try my best—it’s hard to condense into a few paragraphs!

First off, Agent Jeffries (Bowie) walks out of an elevator, similar to when Philip Gerard walks out of the elevator in the pilot episode. Knowing David Lynch, this could mean there’s a connection between the two.

Cooper walks in and out in front of the security cameras, for whatever reason. When he walks back into the security room, Jeffries walks past but the footage shows Cooper still staring at the cameras. This has something to do with Cooper’s soul being trapped—again, that’s just one interpretation.

Jeffries had disappeared while on a case. In a early draft of Fire Walk with Me, it was said he was in Buenos Aires with Judy—an unseen person who is mentioned throughout the film. There’s been theories that Judy was another of BOB’s victims before Theresa Banks and Laura and there’s been theories that she was Josie Packard’s sister. No one’s quite sure but that’s why Jeffries says “we’re not gonna talk about Judy” and “Judy is positive about this.”

When Jeffries points at Cooper and says “who do you think this is there?”, it seems to imply Jeffries know what’s going to happen to Cooper—or what has happened to Cooper, time is non-linear in The Black Lodge. The television static throughout the scene represents The Black Lodge and its inhabitants.

Then comes the really surreal parts. The meeting of Black Lodge inhabitants above a convenience store. It’s important to note MIKE’s appearance in Cooper’s dream in “Episode 2” when he said he and BOB “lived among the people” above the store. This is either a physical place where Black Lodge inhabitants go to collect/feed on garmonbozia (“pain and suffering”) or part of the Black Lodge itself.

The Man from Another Place (MIKE), BOB, Mrs. Tremond/Chalfont, her grandson and four other spirits are there. Who or what exactly the other spirits, no one’s quite sure. It’s implied that the spirit in the red suit and mask is “The Magician” who “longs to see” from the Fire Walk with Me poem, as his mask has no holes. Mrs. Tremond/Chalfont’s grandson also wears the mask.

The grandson also points at BOB and says “fell a victim.” My own interpretation is that he cannot collect garmonbozia as MFAP (MIKE) has given BOB’s victim the ring, meaning only MIKE can consume it. This is why BOB antagonizes MIKE and summons the fire.

Jeffries disappears from the FBI office and the front desk said “he was never here.” However, he’s seen by Cooper, Gordon and Albert and shows up on the security footage. Seeing as the security footage shows Cooper’s soul (or so my theory goes), then it shows Jeffries’ soul/spirit too.

Also, this scene wasn’t supposed to be as confusing and surreal as it is. It was supposed to be two separate scenes: one showing Jeffries explaining everything and one showing the convenience store meeting. Lynch had to combine the two to save time. 

To sum it up: Jeffries most likely visited/was taken to The Black Lodge while investigating a case and the whole scene is a recollection of his experience.

Josie Packard’s death in “Episode 23” (“The Condemned Woman”) is never elaborated upon throughout the serie’s final episodes. After her death, Cooper sees a vision of BOB and Josie’s face becomes morphed into a bedside dresser knob in The Great Northern.BOB’s appearance seems unrelated to her death, however, Frank Silva revealed at the 1993 Twin Peaks Festival that BOB had taken Josie to The Black Lodge. A scene, featuring Josie sticking her head through The Red Room’s curtains, was filmed but not included in “Episode 29” (“Beyond Life and Death”). In “Episode 27” (“The Path to the Black Lodge”), Pete Martell murmurs “Josie, I can see your face” near the fireplace in The Great Northern’s lobby, suggesting Josie’s soul might be trapped in the wood of the hotel.
One theory suggests half of Josie’s soul (her body) is in The Black Lodge and the other (her face) is trapped in The Great Northern. As her body is only seen in The Black Lodge and her face in the hotel, it is implied she is caught “between two worlds”—sound familiar?

Josie Packard’s death in “Episode 23” (“The Condemned Woman”) is never elaborated upon throughout the serie’s final episodes. After her death, Cooper sees a vision of BOB and Josie’s face becomes morphed into a bedside dresser knob in The Great Northern.

BOB’s appearance seems unrelated to her death, however, Frank Silva revealed at the 1993 Twin Peaks Festival that BOB had taken Josie to The Black Lodge. A scene, featuring Josie sticking her head through The Red Room’s curtains, was filmed but not included in “Episode 29” (“Beyond Life and Death”). In “Episode 27” (“The Path to the Black Lodge”), Pete Martell murmurs “Josie, I can see your face” near the fireplace in The Great Northern’s lobby, suggesting Josie’s soul might be trapped in the wood of the hotel.

One theory suggests half of Josie’s soul (her body) is in The Black Lodge and the other (her face) is trapped in The Great Northern. As her body is only seen in The Black Lodge and her face in the hotel, it is implied she is caught “between two worlds”—sound familiar?